OSHA ETS: What Health Care Providers Need to Know

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June 18, 2021
John R. Hayes
SmithAmundsen Labor & Employment Alert

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On June 10, 2021 OSHA issued its COVID-19 Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS) for the health care industry, along with general guidance for all other employers, which we already touched on in a previous post. However, there remains a lot to unpack, as there are many unanswered questions, especially for the health care field.  Below we dig a bit deeper into the ETS and its practical implications for health care providers.

Are you covered? The first question—and it is not as clear cut as it may seem—is whether the ETS applies to your business. OSHA has issued a flowchart to attempt to answer this question. However, it still remains murky for some. Generally, the ETS applies to settings where coronavirus patients are treated (including hospitals, nursing homes and assisted living facilities) and covers “all settings where any employee provides health care services or health care support services.” These are defined as:

The ETS contains several exemptions to its coverage, and it does not apply to:

  1. the dispensing of prescriptions by pharmacists in retail settings;
  2. non-hospital ambulatory care settings (outpatient settings such as doctor’s offices) where all non-employees are screened before entering and people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 are not allowed to enter;
  3. well-defined hospital ambulatory care settings and home health care settings where all employees are fully vaccinated, all non-employees are screened prior to entry, and people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 are not permitted to enter those settings or are not present;
  4. health care support services not performed in a health care setting (off-site services); and
  5. telehealth services performed outside of a setting where direct patient care occurs. 

Moreover, in certain situations, such as where a health care setting is embedded with a non-health care provider (such as a medical clinic in a manufacturing facility), the ETS applies only to the embedded health care setting and not the other parts of the facility. 

Also, in well-defined areas in a health care setting where there is no reasonable expectation that any person with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 will be present the ETS provisions for PPE, physical distancing, and physical barriers do not apply to fully vaccinated employees. To meet this exception, the COVID-19 plan for the employer must include policies and procedures to determine employee vaccination status.

ETS Mandates. If you are an entity covered by the ETS, then what exactly does it require of you? The main requirements are what you have likely had in place throughout the pandemic:

Medical Removal Protection (MRP) Benefits. Employers with more than 10 employees must provide paid leave to employees if the employee is removed from the workplace under the ETS – basically if the employee is unable to work due to COVID-19 or COVID-19 exposure, regardless of whether the employee was exposed at work or outside the workplace.

Implementation Timeline. Covered employers must comply with most provisions of the standard within 14 days of publishing, and with the provisions regarding physical barriers, ventilation, and training within 30 days. OSHA states it will use its enforcement discretion to avoid citing employers who are making a good faith effort to comply with the ETS. However, OSHA has made no secret it is overall increasing its enforcement, and is encouraging more in-person inspections. Employers who believe they may be subject to the ETS should review it carefully and consult with experienced employment counsel regarding their obligations under the ETS.